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comparteLotería app

La aplicación para móviles Android comparteLotería te permite permite crear participaciones virtuales de décimos de la Lotería Nacional de manera rápida y sencilla (incluyendo por supuesto para los sorteos de "El Gordo de Navidad" y "El Niño"). Además la app te avisará el mismo día del sorteo si has sido agraciado/a. Compra tu décimo en la administración que quieras y luego compártelo con tus amigos y familiares usando esta app, ¡es totalmente gratuíta! ¡Sin ningún tipo de costes ni restricciones y sin publicidad!!!

Disponible en la Google Pay Store
Vídeo de presentación y demostración de uso en YouTube

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